The Eve of St. Agnes

Verses 29-35

    Then by the bed-side, where the faded moon
    Made a dim, silver twilight, soft he set
    A table, and, half anguish’d, threw thereon
    A cloth of woven crimson, gold, and jet:–
    O for some drowsy Morphean amulet!
    The boisterous, midnight, festive clarion,
    The kettle-drum, and far-heard clarinet,
    Affray his ears, though but in dying tone:–
The hall door shuts again, and all the noise is gone.

    And still she slept an azure-lidded sleep,
    In blanched linen, smooth, and lavender’d,
    While he from forth the closet brought a heap
    Of candied apple, quince, and plum, and gourd
    With jellies soother than the creamy curd,
    And lucent syrops, tinct with cinnamon;
    Manna and dates, in argosy transferr’d
    From Fez; and spiced dainties, every one,
From silken Samarcand to cedar’d Lebanon.

    These delicates he heap’d with glowing hand
    On golden dishes and in baskets bright
    Of wreathed silver: sumptuous they stand
    In the retired quiet of the night,
    Filling the chilly room with perfume light.–
    "And now, my love, my seraph fair, awake!
    Thou art my heaven, and I thine eremite:
    Open thine eyes, for meek St Agnes’ sake,
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache."

    Thus whispering, his warm, unnerved arm
    Sank in her pillow. Shaded was her dream
    By the dusk curtains:–’twas a midnight charm
    Impossible to melt as iced stream:
    The lustrous salvers in the moonlight gleam;
    Broad golden fringe upon the carpet lies:
    It seem’d he never, never could redeem
    From such a stedfast spell his lady’s eyes;
So mus’d awhile, entoil’d in woofed phantasies.

    Awakening up, he took her hollow lute,–
    Tumultuous,–and, in chords that tenderest be,
    He play’d an ancient ditty, long since mute,
    In Provence call’d, "La belle dame sans mercy:"
    Close to her ear touching the melody:–
    Wherewith disturb’d, she utter’d a soft moan:
    He ceased–she panted quick–and suddenly
    Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone:
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone.

    Her eyes were open, but she still beheld,
    Now wide awake, the vision of her sleep:
    There was a painful change, that nigh expell’d
    The blisses of her dream so pure and deep,
    At which fair Madeline began to weep,
    And moan forth witless words with many a sigh;
    While still her gaze on Porphyro would keep;
    Who knelt, with joined hands and piteous eye,
Fearing to move or speak, she look’d so dreamingly.

    "Ah, Porphyro!" said she, "but even now
    Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear,
    Made tuneable with every sweetest vow;
    And those sad eyes were spiritual and clear:
    How chang’d thou art! how pallid, chill, and drear!
    Give me that voice again, my Porphyro,
    Those looks immortal, those complainings dear!
    Oh leave me not in this eternal woe,
For if thou diest, my Love, I know not where to go."

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