Come into the Garden, Maud

by ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON (1809-1892)

Continued from Page 1

From the meadow your walks have left so sweet
That whenever a March-wind sighs
He sets the jewelprint of your feet
In violets blue as your eyes,
To the woody hollows in which we meet
And the valleys of Paradise.

The slender acacia would not shake
One long milk-bloom on the tree;
The white lake-blossom fell into the lake,
As the pimpernel dozed on the lea;
But the rose was awake all night for your sake,
Knowing your promise to me;
The lilies and roses were all awake,
They sigh’d for the dawn and thee.

Queen rose of the rosebud garden of girls,
Come hither, the dances are done,
In gloss of satin and glimmer of pearls,
Queen lily and rose in one;
Shine out, little head, sunning over with curls,
To the flowers, and be their sun.

There has fallen a splendid tear
From the passion-flower at the gate.
She is coming, my dove, my dear;
She is coming, my life, my fate;
The red rose cries, “She is near, she is near;”
And the white rose weeps, “She is late;”
The larkspur listens, “I hear, I hear;”
And the lily whispers, “I wait.”

She is coming, my own, my sweet;
Were it ever so airy a tread,
My heart would hear her and beat,
Were it earth in an earthy bed;
My dust would hear her and beat,
Had I lain for a century dead;
Would start and tremble under her feet,
And blossom in purple and red.

The poet laureate was traditionally responsible for writing and presenting official poetry to commemorate important occasions both personal (the monarch’s birthday, royal births, marriages) and public (coronations, military victories). This custom ceased to be obligatory after the death of Henry James Pye in 1813. Upon Pye’s death, the post was held by William Wordsworth, followed by Tennyson.

More Tennyson Contemporaries
W.S. Gilbert
Letitia E. Landon
John Hay
Phoebe Cary

Share